Toon Books – Read About Comics http://www.readaboutcomics.com Where to find out what's really good. Mon, 16 Nov 2015 17:36:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.10 Secret of the Stone Frog http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2012/10/03/secret-of-the-stone-frog/ Wed, 03 Oct 2012 13:00:40 +0000 http://www.readaboutcomics.com/?p=2423 By David Nytra80 pages, black and whitePublished by Toon Books

Toon Books is known for creating a smart synthesis between children’s books and graphic novels; their books appropriate the storytelling traditions and techniques of both and turn them into a bridge between the slightly different formats. With The Secret of the Stone Frog, though, Toon [...]]]> By David Nytra
80 pages, black and white
Published by Toon Books

Toon Books is known for creating a smart synthesis between children’s books and graphic novels; their books appropriate the storytelling traditions and techniques of both and turn them into a bridge between the slightly different formats. With The Secret of the Stone Frog, though, Toon has published a full graphic novel for younger readers by David Nytra. And as it turns out, it was well worth the wait with a graceful, dreamy story that captures the imagination.

Nytra’s plot for The Secret of the Stone Frog is a fairly simple one; children Leah and Alan wake up in a strange forest and try to find their way home, with only a series of talking stone frog statues to help guide them back. As they stray from the frog’s path, though, danger quickly finds them over and over again. It’s the sort of structure that allows Nytra to hang just about anything he wants on it; as soon as the duo leave the path, all sorts of strange things can appear with only Nytra’s imagination as the limit.

Nytra’s story is the sort that’s well built for the graphic novel format. There’s one part in particular that uses a convention that wouldn’t have the same effect in any other medium, as a massive bee grabs a word balloon coming out of Alan’s mouth and starts to cart it away, rendering him mute. Only once Leah is able to chase down the bee, get the balloon back, and roll it up so she can feed it back to Alan is he able to talk again. It’s a great nod to the way that comics work, and it’s that sort of cleverness that made me tickled by The Secret of the Stone Frog. As mentioned earlier, just about anything can happen in this book; in many ways it reminds me of Winsor McCay’s classic comic strip Little Nemo in Slumberland, as things start out rather normal and then start twisting and changing the more you look at them.

Nytra’s art also has a certain similarity to McCay’s comics in the way that he draws his characters. They’ve got very loose features (perhaps so that it’s easier for children to identify with them?) and their expressions are always one of wonder and excitement, similar to Nemo’s wide-eyed looks back in the day. The rest of the art serves as a start contrast to his two protagonists, though; it’s very richly detailed, with so much packed onto the page that if the credits hadn’t mentioned what tools Nytra used you’d assume it required computers to get all of those little lines onto the page. Everything from massive rabbits to ambulatory fish in three-piece suits comes to life here, and in a way that will have you staring at the art for hours.

One thing that I appreciated was that while there’s one very small moral embedded into the story—it’s only by not listening to the advice of the stone frog that Leah and Alan find themselves in trouble—it’s never particularly overt. Instead it’s a tumbling, jaunty story that pushes them from one strange encounter to the next. The lack of overtness is part of the key of the charm in this book, too; most older readers will quickly pick up on the fact that Leah and Alan are dreaming, but Nytra never states it point-blank. Younger readers can enjoy the story in its own right, and as they grow a little older pick up on the additional nature of the story.

The Secret of the Stone Frog might be both Toon Books’ and Nytra’s first graphic novel, but hopefully it won’t be the last. This is a real joy to read and I’m already eager to see more. Younger readers will enjoy the adventure and anything-can-happen attitude, while older readers will also get out of it a strong appreciation for the amount of craft that goes into the art. This is the sort of gift that when you buy, you run the risk of quietly sitting down and reading it for yourself, first.

Purchase Links: Amazon.com | Powell’s Books

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Maya Makes a Mess http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2012/09/12/maya-makes-a-mess/ Wed, 12 Sep 2012 20:00:41 +0000 http://www.readaboutcomics.com/?p=2380 By Rutu Modan32 pages, colorPublished by Toon Books

Toon Books is a publisher that specializes in a synthesis of children’s books and comics. These books use the structure of both mediums to form beautiful graphic novels aimed at children of different ages that not only serve as gateways to comics, but also are genuinely enjoyable [...]]]> By Rutu Modan
32 pages, color
Published by Toon Books

Toon Books is a publisher that specializes in a synthesis of children’s books and comics. These books use the structure of both mediums to form beautiful graphic novels aimed at children of different ages that not only serve as gateways to comics, but also are genuinely enjoyable in their own right. With three new books being released by Toon Books, today’s “Quick Takes” reviews focus on the latest publications from Toon.

Maya Makes a Mess is the first children’s book I’ve seen by Actus comic collective creator Rutu Modan, but I hope it won’t be the last. It takes a familiar litany from a parent—asking a child to show some manners when eating at the table—and turns it nicely on its ear when Maya’s father’s threat, "What if you were eating dinner with the Queen?" is suddenly put to the test when Maya receives an invitation to do just that. At its core, Maya Makes a Mess is a beautiful flight of fancy from a child who imagines a theoretical situation playing out in only the way that a kid can, and it’s pitch-perfect. Every little step of Maya’s journey is well told, and it’s all in Maya’s voice, with that childlike yet wide-eyed exuberance. Parents might not be able to teach their children the manners they want through Maya Makes a Mess, but they will surely teach them fun.

Modan’s art looks great here too; she packs in a ton of detail on every page, especially when it comes to the banquet. With lots of tiny, intricate lines the pages have a lot to examine, from strands of spaghetti to petals on flowers. Half of the fun is just watching what’s going on in every page; Modan doesn’t skimp on a single page, and because of that Maya Makes a Mess is wonderfully re-readable. You’re almost guaranteed to see something new each time, and that’s a rarity in a children’s book. I was delighted to see Toon publish a children’s book from indy comic artist R. Kikuo Johnson (The Shark King) earlier this year, and it’s a joy to see them cast that net wide once more with Modan. All in all, another winner from Modan and Toon Books.

Purchase Links: Amazon.com | Powell’s Books

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Benny and Penny in Lights Out! http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2012/09/12/benny-and-penny-lights-out/ Wed, 12 Sep 2012 16:00:44 +0000 http://www.readaboutcomics.com/?p=2381 By Geoffrey Hayes32 pages, colorPublished by Toon Books

Toon Books is a publisher that specializes in a synthesis of children’s books and comics. These books use the structure of both mediums to form beautiful graphic novels aimed at children of different ages that not only serve as gateways to comics, but also are genuinely enjoyable [...]]]> By Geoffrey Hayes
32 pages, color
Published by Toon Books

Toon Books is a publisher that specializes in a synthesis of children’s books and comics. These books use the structure of both mediums to form beautiful graphic novels aimed at children of different ages that not only serve as gateways to comics, but also are genuinely enjoyable in their own right. With three new books being released by Toon Books, today’s “Quick Takes” reviews focus on the latest publications from Toon.

Geoffrey Hayes’s Benny and Penny books are some of my favorites in the publishing line, so a new installment from Hayes was bound to tickle my fancy. Benny and Penny in Lights Out! does just that, as the brother-and-sister duo get ready for bed, tell each other scary stories, and sneak out a window into the dark to try and find Benny’s missing pirate hat. What’s great about Benny and Penny in Lights Out! (and the Benny and Penny books in general) is that despite the verbal sparring that the duo occasionally have, there’s a certain level of affection that’s always present between the two. Penny clearly looks up to her big brother, and Benny himself has a protective side that will surface as need be.

I also appreciated that for all of Benny’s bluster, it’s Penny who can kick up the bravery when it needs to be present; she might be the little sister but she’s not afraid to be the tough one when need be. Add in some beautiful art from Hayes, with soft gentle shading that draws you into the page, and you’re hooked. I love the big two-page spread of Penny outside at night by herself, and Hayes plays with light and shadow quite effectively for a book set in the dark hours. Aimed at first and second graders, Benny and Penny in Lights Out! is a book that parents will enjoy reading by themselves as much as they will with their children. I might be about to enter my 40s, but I’ll cheerfully keep collecting all the Benny and Penny books for my own bookshelves.

Purchase Links: Amazon.com | Powell’s Books

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A Trip to the Bottom of the World with Mouse http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2012/09/12/bottom-of-the-world/ Wed, 12 Sep 2012 13:00:38 +0000 http://www.readaboutcomics.com/?p=2379 By Frank Viva32 pages, colorPublished by Toon Books

Toon Books is a publisher that specializes in a synthesis of children’s books and comics. These books use the structure of both mediums to form beautiful graphic novels aimed at children of different ages that not only serve as gateways to comics, but also are genuinely enjoyable [...]]]> By Frank Viva
32 pages, color
Published by Toon Books

Toon Books is a publisher that specializes in a synthesis of children’s books and comics. These books use the structure of both mediums to form beautiful graphic novels aimed at children of different ages that not only serve as gateways to comics, but also are genuinely enjoyable in their own right. With three new books being released by Toon Books, today’s “Quick Takes” reviews focus on the latest publications from Toon.

I’d never heard of Frank Viva before A Trip to the Bottom of the World with Mouse, but now that I’ve seen his art I won’t forget him. Viva’s art looks almost like pieces of construction paper meticulously cut out and glued together onto the page; big, beautiful shapes with colors that are soothing yet noticeable. (In fact, the book was constructed through Adobe Illustrator, which is only sad in that I’d love to have originals on my wall from Viva.) Viva tackles all sorts of images here, from orca and penguins to icebergs and waves. The Antarctic region comes across as a beautiful and soothing place thanks to Viva, and for that alone you’ll want to look at A Trip to the Bottom of the World with Mouse.

Fortunately the storytelling is strong here, too. Aimed at very young readers, Viva uses patterns and repetition to keep the attention of the little kids, but fortunately he also keeps it from becoming annoying to adults. Whenever Mouse offers up ideas, Viva divides the landscape-oriented pages into four spots so that parents can point to each and say the item being illustrated there; it’s an effective way to teach kids about both mundane and out-of-the-ordinary things. A Trip to the Bottom of the World with Mouse is enchanting, and hopefully it’s not the first trip that Viva is taking Mouse, his explorer friend, or us. I’m a Viva fan now, and once you look at this book, you’ll be too.

Purchase Links: Amazon.com | Powell’s Books

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Shark King http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2012/04/04/shark-king/ Wed, 04 Apr 2012 13:00:23 +0000 http://www.readaboutcomics.com/?p=2243 By R. Kikuo Johnson40 pages, colorPublished by Toon Books

When R. Kikuo Johnson’s Night Fisher graphic novel was published in 2005, I remember a lot of people proclaiming him to be the next big thing in comics. The book and Johnson got their fair share of awards, but since then there’s been remarkably little in [...]]]> By R. Kikuo Johnson
40 pages, color
Published by Toon Books

When R. Kikuo Johnson’s Night Fisher graphic novel was published in 2005, I remember a lot of people proclaiming him to be the next big thing in comics. The book and Johnson got their fair share of awards, but since then there’s been remarkably little in the way of new creations from Johnson. I think I was as surprised as anyone else when The Shark King was announced; a book for young readers was almost certainly not where I’d expected him to show up next. This retelling of a Hawaiian myth, though, is going to enchant readers of all ages.

The Shark King is in many ways one of those classic mythological stories; a woman who is seduced by a god, then raises their child and tries to find a balance between his human and divine sides. Nanaue, as a half-human/half-god, comes across as a charming character in Johnson’s retelling. This is a good thing; if you look at the character from a clinical perspective, I can see where it would be easy to make him unlikable. After all, this is a kid who steals from the fishermen around him and is increasingly stubborn. Here, though, you want him to succeed anyway. He’s got a certain sweetness and innocence about him, and that’s a perfect balance to his other actions.

His mother Kalei comes across a little less developed, although she’s most certainly just a supporting character in The Shark King. She’s there to deliver a child and warnings, but while she comes across as a bit naive from time to time, I found myself appreciating her spirit. Her position in The Shark King is not an easy to be in, but Johnson had me liking her a great deal as the book progressed, for her spirit as much as her warmth. Even the little details of The Shark King stick out, be it introducing the reader to a sea mollusk known as the opihi, or the idea of the shape-shifting Shark King himself. It’s ultimately an enjoyable book, one that made me feel like I did when I’d first learned about Greek and Roman mythology; it makes me want to seek out more in the way of the Hawaiian mythos.

Johnson’s art in The Shark King is beautiful, using soft, graceful lines to block out characters similar to the way artists like Peter Snejbjerg and Gilbert Hernandez draw their comics. Watching Nanaue run around the island is fun, and the scenes with Kalei and the Shark King having a surprising amount of body language on display; you get a strong feel for their personalities by the way that they carry themselves. The best part about The Shark King‘s art is probably how Johnson draws the setting, though; Hawaii bursts to life in gorgeous landscapes, and the number of aquatic animals that Johnson draws can’t help but enchant the reader. Even something as simple as the constellation of the Shark King is perfectly executed, in a way that creates a memorable image that the reader will certainly take away from the book.

Toon Books regularly turns out excellent graphic novels for kids, but The Shark King is definitely up in the top part of that list. I’d cheerfully read a series of Hawaiian tale graphic novels from Johnson (hint hint); this is the kind of book that I think parents would enjoy reading together with their children as much as the kids would. For people all ages interested in mythology, you can’t go wrong with The Shark King.

Purchase Links: Amazon.com | Powell’s Books

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Benjamin Bear in Fuzzy Thinking http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2012/02/24/benjamin-bear-in-fuzzy-thinking/ Fri, 24 Feb 2012 20:00:33 +0000 http://www.readaboutcomics.com/?p=2142 By Philippe Coudray32 pages, colorPublished by Toon Books

One of the latest publications from Toon Books is Benjamin Bear in Fuzzy Thinking, aimed at first and second graders. While I’ve always said that there’s a lot to love from the Toon Books line for older readers, it’s Benjamin Bear in Fuzzy Thinking where I feel [...]]]> By Philippe Coudray
32 pages, color
Published by Toon Books

One of the latest publications from Toon Books is Benjamin Bear in Fuzzy Thinking, aimed at first and second graders. While I’ve always said that there’s a lot to love from the Toon Books line for older readers, it’s Benjamin Bear in Fuzzy Thinking where I feel like we’ve got a book that anyone from the age of 5 to 105 will enjoy. Philippe Coudray writes and draws a series of one-page gage strips starring Benjamin Bear and his friends, in a series of events that goes from a trip to the grocery store, to a visit from the man in the moon. There’s a wonderful ridiculousness about each story though, as Coudray goes for a goofiness that can’t help but make you laugh.

Coudray’s art is simple but effective; the pages have an easy to follow structure, and the art uses a handful of lines to make Benjamin and company look iconic and expressive. Coudray’s jokes sometimes rely on motion, too (like an inventive way to get a rabbit from one cliff to another that’s too far for it to jump), and I feel like he’s able to get those ideas across to his readers of all ages with ease.

Every now and then, Coudray’s punch lines aren’t so much humorous as they are sweet; a show of friendship, be it getting an apple off a tree or staying warm at night. I think that’s what ultimately helps Benjamin Bear in Fuzzy Thinking work so well; it’s not just fall-over laughing humor, but there’s a softer side that appears from time to time. It shifts the book from strictly humor to a well-rounded book. Go out and buy it for that little kid in your life… but don’t blame me if you open it up to take a look and end up reading the entire thing. It’s just great.

Purchase Links: Amazon.com | Powell’s Books

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Chick and Chickie Play All Day! http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2012/02/24/chick-and-chickie-play-all-day/ Fri, 24 Feb 2012 18:00:31 +0000 http://www.readaboutcomics.com/?p=2141 By Claude Ponti32 pages, colorPublished by Toon Books

Claude Ponti’s Chick and Chickie Play All Day! is a comic aimed for beginning readers, so like most children’s books for that earliest age, it’s a simple story. What impressed me almost off the bat, though, was how well Ponti uses the ideas behind sequential art storytelling [...]]]> By Claude Ponti
32 pages, color
Published by Toon Books

Claude Ponti’s Chick and Chickie Play All Day! is a comic aimed for beginning readers, so like most children’s books for that earliest age, it’s a simple story. What impressed me almost off the bat, though, was how well Ponti uses the ideas behind sequential art storytelling in a way that will subtly teach those littlest of readers how to read comics. Presented in a landscape format, Ponti sometimes uses the two-page spread as a single panel, other times as two panels. In doing so, he’s showing his readers the progression of time, either through a panel border or through a long stretch of space. As they walk across the spreads, you get the sensation of scenes taking longer than a single moment; it’s impressive when you realize that he’s using these storytelling techniques for young readers who will almost certainly grab what he’s doing and take it with them.

The story itself in Chick and Chickie Play All Day! is cute, too; it’s about a pair of chicks who first make masks and scare one another, and then play with a massive, ambulatory letter A. The second half feels like a good way to introduce those little readers into the idea of there being more than one "A" sound, and to also play with the idea of inflection creating meaning. Add in some charming illustrations, and this is a winner for those new readers in your household. Plus, if that’s not enough, you can also start prepping them into the world of comics. Everyone wins.

Purchase Links: Amazon.com | Powell’s Books

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Zig and Wikki in The Cow http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2012/02/24/zig-and-wikki-in-the-cow/ http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2012/02/24/zig-and-wikki-in-the-cow/#comments Fri, 24 Feb 2012 16:00:29 +0000 http://www.readaboutcomics.com/?p=2140 Written by Nadja SpiegelmanArt by Trade Loeffler40 pages, colorPublished by Toon Books

Two years ago Toon Books published Zig and Wikki in Something Ate My Homework, an educational comic book about two aliens exploring Earth. Imagine my surprise to see that there’s now a sequel, Zig and Wikki in The Cow, which is just as [...]]]> Written by Nadja Spiegelman
Art by Trade Loeffler
40 pages, color
Published by Toon Books

Two years ago Toon Books published Zig and Wikki in Something Ate My Homework, an educational comic book about two aliens exploring Earth. Imagine my surprise to see that there’s now a sequel, Zig and Wikki in The Cow, which is just as charming as the first offering. Zig and Wikki in The Cow is a direct sequel to the first book, although readers who haven’t read the earlier graphic novel will still be just fine. Having left Earth with a fly as a pet, Zig and Wikki get worried about the fly’s health and come back to try and make it better. In the process, the pair learn about ecosystems and how each piece of the system has an important duty. At the same time, Nadja Spiegelman mixes in facts about different creatures and organisms, some humor, and a good dose of friendship. It’s great because each reader will get something a little different from the book; some will focus on Wikki feeling like Zig isn’t being his close friend, while others will no doubt me more interested in the idea of the characters getting deliberately eaten by a cow. Since Zig and Wikki in The Cow is aimed at Toon Books’ oldest readers (second and third grade), Spiegelman has to give a slightly more robust plot than some other books in the line, but it works well.

Trade Loeffler’s art is fun as always; Wikki holding up grass so that a cow will eat him is funny, and Zig’s cyclops eye with tentacle arms looks charming rather than creepy. Loeffler once more has his work cut out for him thanks to getting to draw everything from a cow stomach to dung beetles, but he handles it all with equal aplomb, even when drawing an entire herd of cows where it’s just been pointed out that no two have the same pattern. Zig and Wikki in The Cow is another good book from Toon Books; this is a comic that both kids and parents will appreciate. If there are more Zig and Wikki books down the line, I’ll definitely be buying them for the younger kids in my life.

Purchase Links: Amazon.com | Powell’s Books

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Silly Lilly in What Will I Be Today? http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2012/02/24/silly-lilly/ Fri, 24 Feb 2012 14:00:21 +0000 http://www.readaboutcomics.com/?p=2137 By Agnès Rosenstiehl32 pages, colorPublished by Toon Books

Agnès Rosenstiehl’s Silly Lilly in What Will I Be Today? is a short and sweet book for first-time readers, but one that is surprisingly charming. Rosenstiehl tells a series of eight-panel adventures about her title character Lilly, as she decides each day of the week what her [...]]]> By Agnès Rosenstiehl
32 pages, color
Published by Toon Books

Agnès Rosenstiehl’s Silly Lilly in What Will I Be Today? is a short and sweet book for first-time readers, but one that is surprisingly charming. Rosenstiehl tells a series of eight-panel adventures about her title character Lilly, as she decides each day of the week what her new profession will be. As she exclaims on the cover, "I can be anything!" that’s exactly what Rosenstiehl is telling her readers, shifting from cook or city planner to acrobat or vampire. It’s a strong message, but one that’s still disguised in fun. Rosenstiehl’s voice for Lilly is wonderfully accurate for a little kid; you can "hear" her as she plays by herself, coming up with a method to best act out her new job.

The art is awfully cute, too; Lilly as acrobat is a big jumble of limbs as she tries to push herself through gymnastics routine, and the stern look she gives her doll and teddy bear for not singing along to Lilly’s xylophone symphony is bretty darn funny. (Even better is how on the previous panel, the pair of toys wince she she hits a particularly loud note.) Rosenstiehl’s watercolors give the book an overall lush look, and I can’t think of a parent who wouldn’t be delighted with being given a copy of Silly Lilly in What Will I Be Today?. Like so many of Toon Books’ publications, this is a good way to start teaching little kids how to read comics, and to have fun at the same time.

Purchase Links: Amazon.com | Powell’s Books

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Nina in That Makes Me Mad! http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2011/12/07/nina-in-that-makes-me-mad/ http://www.readaboutcomics.com/2011/12/07/nina-in-that-makes-me-mad/#comments Wed, 07 Dec 2011 14:00:09 +0000 http://www.readaboutcomics.com/?p=1938 By Hilary KnightBased on a text by Steven Kroll32 pages, colorPublished by Toon Books

When I think of Hilary Knight, it’s hard to not instantly have the classic Eloise children’s books leap to mind, which he illustrated (and were written by Kay Thompson). His lush drawings of Eloise everywhere from the Plaza Hotel to Communist [...]]]> By Hilary Knight
Based on a text by Steven Kroll
32 pages, color
Published by Toon Books

When I think of Hilary Knight, it’s hard to not instantly have the classic Eloise children’s books leap to mind, which he illustrated (and were written by Kay Thompson). His lush drawings of Eloise everywhere from the Plaza Hotel to Communist Russia are true treasures of the medium, the sort of fact that I think few would ever be able to disagree on. So with the release of Nina in That Makes Me Mad!, a new children’s book/comic by Hilary Knight, based off of a story by Steven Kroll? Well, to say that I was excited was an understatement. But at the same time, I was a little worried that I’d set my expectations too high.

The basic structure for Nina in That Makes Me Mad! is episodic, each two page chapter opening with a full-page chapter title and single illustration what something that makes Nina mad, followed by the facing page having a vignette that brings it to life. So for example, "When you get mad at me and I didn’t do it" then tells the story of Nina getting in trouble for splashing water out of the tub, when it was her infant brother Tony who soaked the bathroom. Each story stands alone, although it’s all capped off with a final two-pager that concludes the book nicely.

At first, I’ll admit I was a tiny bit disappointed. I opened the book and instead of seeing the richly detailed art of Eloise, I found a slightly stripped-down, more simple style of art from Knight. But the more I read Nina, the more enchanted by it I became. Unlike Eloise, this isn’t a fantastical, lavish, over-the-top world that Nina is living in, here. So it makes sense for Knight to take a different tactic for Nina in That Makes Me Mad!, to instead give less focus on an opulent surrounding and more on Nina herself. In this different style, Knight’s art is still beautifully expressive. The look of satisfaction on Nina’s face when she presents the fully-diapered Tony to her mother is just marvelous, a combination of smugness and victory wrapped together. Each two-pager also has one or two colors that Knight uses to tie the vignette; it’s a nice visual touch to make each mini-story feel like its own special package.

Just as importantly, the book itself moves smoothly. Knight and Kroll give legitimate reasons for Nina to get mad in each stressful situation, and I appreciated that sometimes it’s over something that’s Nina’s fault, sometimes it’s through the actions of a different person. Whatever the reason, though, you can feel the frustration and disappointment build, and it’s always something that a young reader would be able to empathize with. That’s in part why the final chapter is so important; it shows Nina expressing her anger in a way that then helps give a resolution to her issue and make it better. Young readers will definitely get a lot from this book, perhaps in no small part because of how much they’ll be able to understand almost everything Nina goes through in the pages leading up to that moment.

Nina in That Makes Me Mad! is an adorable book; I found myself loving a new-to-me style of art from Knight, and his working off of Kroll’s story provided a thoroughly satisfying story to read. Just about every title from Toon Books results in a great children’s book/comic that will not only be enjoyed by its target age group, but by whomever did the actual purchasing. In an industry where so many children’s books are ridiculously inane, this is one where I would be just fine reading with my child over and over again.

Purchase Links: Amazon.com | Powell’s Books

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